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ISSUE ONE, 2014

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A Winning Smile

It’s the face “lift” that also lifts your mood. Smiling can alter your brain chemistry, reduce your stress, and make you happier.

Peacefull candles burning with river rocks.

Smiling can lift your mood – Smiling alters your body’s chemistry by increasing the amount of endorphin and serotonin that are available to your body. Numerous studies have found that these two neuro-chemicals can help with those bodily changes that you experience as a good mood:

  • Body relaxes
  • Heart rate lowers
  • Blood pressure lowers
  • Breath becomes steady
  • Feelings of stress ease
  • Mood lifts

Also, when you’re in a good mood, you have the potential to improve the mood of those around you.

Smiling can trigger the nervous system to rest – Smiling can set the “relaxation response” in motion. This activation of the body’s parasympathetic nervous system, which is sometimes referred to as the “rest and digest” mode—in contrast to the “flight or fight” response of the sympathetic nervous system—allows your overall nervous system to take a well-deserved rest.

Smiling may boost your immune system function – In turn, the sense of relaxation produced by smiling allows your immune system to maintain a more positive, stress-free state in which it can work more efficiently.

Smiling helps you look younger – The muscles that you use to smile are instrumental in “lifting” your face up and making you appear younger. You don’t need to use an unnatural or dramatic smile—just smile naturally.

Smiling can lift your mood – Smiling alters your body’s chemistry by increasing the amount of endorphin and serotonin that are available to your body. Numerous studies have found that these two neuro-chemicals can help with those bodily changes that you experience as a good mood:

Smiling can change people’s attitude toward you – Ask yourself a question—are you more likely to be attracted to people who smile? Various studies have shown that when you smile, you increase your chances of being perceived as an authentic, empathetic, attractive, confident, self-assured, happy, trustworthy, and memorable person. So, try it. Put on a smile. People may view you in a different light.

Smiling may help you live longer – The effects of a good smile are more than skin deep. A recent study out of Wayne State University that looked at the 1952 registry of Major League Baseball players found that players who had a strong smile lived an average of 7 years longer than those who didn’t.

Smiling not only makes you feel good—it can be infectious, causing others to smile as well, which is a win-win situation.